“Andy Warhol’s Influence on Art Today” Glenn O´Brien, Departures, 30 March 2010

“ Warhol’s most radical lesson is reflected in the work of artists of subsequent generations who have infiltrated the publicity machine and the marketplace as a deliberate strategy”

When he was alive, it seemed like Andy Warhol was everywhere, but dying has done nothing to diminish his popularity. In fact it could be argued that Warhol’s death, as Gore Vidal said of Truman Capote’s passing, was “a good career move”. These days Warhol is a movement bordering on a religion, “Warhol’s most radical lesson is reflected in the work of artists of subsequent generations who have infiltrated the publicity machine and the marketplace as a deliberate strategy”. That Warhol created the model for so many of today’s art practices should be obvious to anyone conversant in art of the last 30 years. In his 1975 book, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B and Back Again), Warhol made the first of his notorious statements about business and art. He wrote: “During the hippie era people put down the idea of business—they’d say ‘Money is bad,’ and ‘Working is bad,’ but making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art”. A corporate world called for a corporate artist, when his studies became know as the factory. At the Factory, the crew grew to the size of a small business, Though the idea of the Factory captured the public’s imagination, Warhol later downplayed the term. For him it was the office, an art company where he and “the kids” worked. The Factory allowed Warhol to make paintings and films, publish Interview magazine, make TV commercials and music videos, work as a fashion model, and act on The Love Boat. the new group that take the andy’s influence include Prince, Koons, Hirst, and Murakami, who also happen to be the big money winners of the moment and top stars in the Gagosian Gallery pantheon. And they have lots of what Warhol wanted most: wealth and fame.One of Andy’s most endearing qualities was his jealousy of anyone who had something he didn’t, and the current generation would give him real grounds for turning green. Murakami, Koons, and Hirst all have more employees than Warhol ever did. But Warhol didn’t invent the stances he’s famous for. Salvador Dalí, who was 24 years older, was a master of publicity who dared to utilize his art world status to cash in, Warhol just took it to the next level, updating strategies practiced not only by Dalí but also Duchamp. That legacy continues with Koons, Hirst, Murakami, and numerous artists around the world, For them, the sky’s the limit.

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“Andy Warhol’s Influence on Art Today” Glenn O´Brien, Departures, 30 March 2010

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