“Amid Free Education Protests, College Costs Around The World Reveal Countries’ Differences” Julia Glum, International Business Times, Nov. 4, 2015

All this discussion seems to point to a growing international movement for more affordable education.

International students have been protesting for more affordable education. At first, South African protesters blocked college campuses and raged against parliament to fight tuition hikes. On Wednesday, students in London began a protest on the streets, asking for “grants, not debt.” Principally, the problem at hand is the student debt crisis. The prices for college tuition in various countries reveal markedly different government responses to the concept of free education and levels of affordability. Germany, Brazil, China and India’s decrease in tuition fees has had no positive effect on the high cost of living. Approximately 70 percent of students in the U.S graduated in 2014 with debt. In subsequent years, these student’s debt would be about £40,000, or $61,500. However, schools in Denmark, Finland and Iceland who offer free education to residents also give these students stipends as they are in school and need support. This results in higher numbers of Danish students graduating debt-free. Nevertheless, The Washington Post reports that the high graduation rates of universities in Denmark, may be contributing to the unemployment rates. Free college education: is it truly for better or for worse?

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“Amid Free Education Protests, College Costs Around The World Reveal Countries’ Differences” Julia Glum, International Business Times, Nov. 4, 2015

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